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Home » Car Accidents » How long do I have to file a car accident report?

How long do I have to file a car accident report?

| Mar 22, 2018 | Car Accidents |

The clock starts ticking the moment you have an accident in Kentucky, so it is important to understand the state’s traffic laws and regulations so you can protect your rights. The Bluegrass State limits your time to report an accident, as well as settlement limits and more.

FindLaw explains that you must report the accident within 10 days to the Kentucky State Police. The written report is required in cases of injury or death, or if you believe damages to your car will cost more than $500 to repair.

Kentucky drivers are required to have personal injury insurance on all automobiles, as well as liability insurance to cover injuries and damages from an accident. The minimum amounts are: $10,000 in property damage; $25,000 in bodily injury for each person; and $50,000 in total bodily injury.

As a “no-fault” state, Kentucky drivers have no rights to sue unless the accident results in:

  • Death
  • A broken bone
  • Permanent injury or disfigurement
  • Medical costs of $1,000 or more

Drivers can decide to opt out of the state’s no-fault system and retain their right to sue. To do this, you must submit a special form to Kentucky’s Department of insurance before the limits take effect.

The state does not limit the type or amount of damages you can seek, leaving you free to sue for medical expenses, pain and suffering, car repair or replacement, lost wages, rental cars and more.

You must file a personal injury lawsuit within a year of the accident; for a property damage suit, you have two years to file. If you fail to make a claim in these time periods, your case will not be heard and you will not receive any damages.

This article on Kentucky’s no-fault system is for information only. It should not be considered legal advice.