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What should you do about loose dogs in Kentucky?

| Mar 11, 2021 | Injuries

Anyone who has been in Lexington or Richmond is familiar with one significant issue: There are dogs on the loose regularly. It’s expected with so many farms and city areas that at least some dogs would get out and roam. Unfortunately, it’s extremely common, and those loose dogs put people, livestock, pets and other animals at risk.

While most animals are friendly, not all dogs are good off-leash or in public. Those are the ones who put people at risk of bite injuries and pets at risk of lethal attacks.

Did you know that people have a right to kill a dog that is attacking another animal or person in Kentucky?

The Kentucky statutes that make up the Dog Laws were amended in 2005. The laws now allow people to kill or seize dogs that are attacking, pursuing, wounding or killing another person or animal. For example, if a dog attacks a woman and her leashed pet on a walk, she has every right to pull out a weapon and injure or kill that animal.

In fact, someone who kills or seizes a dangerous animal that was attacking or that had attacked and killed another being will not be held liable for doing so. The state laws distinctly state that the owner of that dog will be liable for any damage it causes, which may include financial damages, medical care costs, funeral expenses and more.

Dog bites are common, so it’s fair to protect yourself

Some people don’t carry weapons with them or prepare to protect themselves for fear that they might be blamed if they have to try to stop an animal that attacks them. The reality is that it is your right to protect yourself when you’re being attacked or charged by a dangerous animal. There is no requirement for a bite to occur first. The law allows you to defend yourself if you are being pursued.

If you are injured by a dog that has been left off-leash, your attorney can help you. They will assist you in reaching out to the owners, so that you can seek compensation for what you’ve been through.